Saturday, January 31, 2009

What's Narro good for?

Being too busy developing the application, I've never described in the simplest way possible what's Narro good for. Since examples are the best way to learn, here's one:

Old process:
  1. svn checkout file.po (CVS, hg, git or any other similar command)
  2. poedit file.po (Open the file with a program to translate it)
  3. svn commit file.po (commit the translations I've made with let's say poEdit)
Actual process using Narro:
  1. svn checkout file.po (CVS, hg, git or any other similar command)
  2. import the file in Narro
  3. translate the file in Narro
  4. export the file from Narro
  5. svn commit file.po (commit the translations I've made with let's say poEdit)

Although it seems that the actual process got complicated, there are several major improvements:
  • one text can have more translations than one
  • people can translate at the same time
  • the only tool they need is a browser
  • I can introduce various methods to improve quality, like the ones already implemented: punctuation check, spell check and entity check
As you can see from the example, the checkout and commit operations are still done the old way, right now using some cron jobs. That's because Narro doesn't know right now to import from something else than a directory. In the next version I plan to add the possibility to write various plugins for sources of translations.

2 comments:

Manuel R. Ciosici said...

How often are the commit operations done? I am curious since a new update to OpenOffice came to my Ubuntu today and still no fix for some bad translations which I've seen fixed in Narro.

Alexandru Szasz said...

I don't handle the Ubuntu/Kiwi OpenOffice.org distribution. The guy that does requested a special export that includes the translations that are not yet approved. So maybe you can ask him, or the Ubuntu localization team.

I maintain packages that have only the approved translations here if you're interested.